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Evil's Second Coming

Evil, like beauty, has always been in the eye of the beholder.

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The last American president to get much mileage out of the word evil was probably Ronald Reagan, with his "evil empire" characterization of the USSR and its sphere of influence. Now, 20 years later, we have a president who sees "an axis of evil" — an alleged phenomenon that puzzles most of the world's leaders, or so they say.



George W. Bush apparently has little use for Franklin D. Roosevelt's stalwart advice to a nation in need of a boost in confidence — "We have nothing to fear but fear itself." Instead, Bush chooses to color-code fear rather than urge his people to rise above it.



The propagandists of the Bush administration have been successful in cultivating the public's anxiety since September. Whether that's been done for our own good remains to be seen. Perhaps it has, but this much is clear now — all the official danger alerts about nuclear power plants, bridges and crop-dusters have been effective in keeping most of the natural questioning of the administration's moves at bay.



To hear Attorney General John Ashcroft tell it, the architects of 9/11 are the personification of the most virulent form of evil ever known. Although much of the evidence that would establish his absolute guilt in connection with 9/11 remains a state secret, Osama bin Laden is said to have shot to the top of the chart. Forget about Joseph Stalin, Adolph Hitler, Idi Amin and Pol Pot. They were amateurs.



Then again, evil, like beauty, has always been in the eye of the beholder.



Wasn't it evil to deliberately dump tons of potent pesticide into the James River during the '70s to make a greedy buck? Once it was in Virginia's water, it turned out that kepone wasn't much different from a bio-terror agent in the same water.



Although it was first reported that the 1995 Oklahoma City bombing that killed 168 people was likely to have been the work of Middle Eastern terrorists, such wild speculation soon fizzled in the face of the facts.



With the news seeping out of the cloisters about child-molesting priests and the Catholic Church's systematic cover-ups, whose betrayal was more evil, the molester or the higher-ups who hid and facilitated his crimes?



Whether evil exists in some pure form, off in another dimension, is not my department. What's known here is that in the real world evil is contagious. Lurking in well-appointed rooms or hiding in caves, evil remains as it ever was — ready to spread.



None of this is to suggest that al Qaida shouldn't be put out of business. It isn't to say that knocking the Taliban off was a bad idea. There's no question here about whether the United States should protect itself from the networks of organized terror that are hell-bent on destroying the modern world.



Still, today's evil is the same evil our forefathers faced in their wars. Evil hasn't changed; technology has. With modern weapons in their hands, the fanatics of the world have the potential to wreak havoc like never before.



What has changed is the extent to which the hate festering in the souls of the world's would-be poobahs and their sociopathic minions has become weaponized.



It's worth noting that the weapons of mass destruction that are scaring us the most were developed during the arms-race days of the Cold War by the game's principal players.



So another question arises, who is more dangerous to civilization, the guys who spent their treasure to weaponize germs, or the guys who want to steal the stuff and use it on somebody?



Decades ago this was a concern expressed by some in the disarmament movement. Its scary what-if scenarios always included the likelihood that the super powers would eventually lose track of some of their exotic weapons. Looking back on it now, it seems obvious that there was no way any government could keep all that material locked away from the greed and hate of determined free-lancers.



A man with a briefcase-style nuclear device may be no more evil than a man armed with a knife. Either danger could kill you just as dead. Those of us who feel connected to others know which one we should fear the most.



The "rough beast" of dreadful evil "slouching toward" us is traveling on the back of technology of our own making. While we watch out for organized terrorists in the short run, with a handy color code to guide us, it's time to think more seriously about how to get rid of a lot of very dangerous weapons in the long run.



F.T. Rea is a free-lance writer who lives in Richmond.



Opinions expressed on the Back Page are those of the writer and not necessarily those of Style Weekly.





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